Self Care Facial Steam

This January and February, our focus is on self-care.

January can be a difficult month, especially so this year as the limitations to our normal daily lives can lead to anxiety and depression if we don’t remember to take some time out to look after ourselves. 

We are going to be sharing some easy, at-home self-care treatments that can add extra benefits to your skin and hair care routines.

Have you ever had a facial steam? Did you know it’s super easy to treat yourself to a diy facial steam at home? 

What are the benefits of treating yourself to a facial steam? 

  • It has a deep cleansing action. Steam is great for opening up the pores and helping to dislodge sebum and dead skin cells which can lead to blackheads. Blackheads are often much easier to remove after a facial steam.
  • It can help with circulation. The hot steam causes your skin to perspire and your blood vessels to dilate, encouraging blood flow to your skin, helping to give your face a healthy glow. 
  • Steam is also hydrating to the skin, and the benefits can be increased if you follow with a hydrating facial cream; such as our hydrating facial silk.
  • The steam and the process of sitting and inhaling the steam and herbs (if using) is really relaxing and can help to calm the mind.

What you will need: 

A large bowl, large enough to fit your face over.

A towel, large enough to cover your head and bowl.

Some herbs, or herbal tea

Hot water

 

How to prepare:

See our short video below showing how simple it really is!

 

Step 1.) Ensure hair is tied away from your face and ensure the skin is cleansed with a natural cleanser such as our plastic free cleansing Kubes for normal skin. If you want to get the most out of your steam, you can exfoliate first with a gentle exfoliator like our plastic free version. Be extra gentle with your skin as the heat from the steam can leave your skin extra sensitive.

Step 2.) Take a handful of herbs, (we love marshmallow root for dry skin) and place in the bowl. You could even use a couple of your favourite herbal tea bags; chamomile works really well for calming the skin.

self care facial steam

 

Step 3.) Pour boiling water over the herbs until the bowl is half-full. Stir a couple of times and then grab your clean towel.

Step 4.) Make sure you are sitting in a comfortable position and place the towel over your head and over the bowl. Start with your head in a forward facing position, then gradually lower your head towards the water, trying to keep as much steam inside the towel as possible. Have some relaxing music on for an extra calming effect!

Step 5. ) Keep your head approximately 15 – 20 cm away from the hot water. Steam can scald the skin and cause burns, so be extra careful. It needs to feel comfortable while still being hot enough for your skin to sweat. Start with your head as far away from the water as you can, then gradually move it closer to the water.

Step 6.) Hold your head above the bowl for 5-10 minutes. If you have very dry skin, you may want to start with 5 minutes and see how it feels afterwards. Move your head closer or further away from the bowl as necessary.

Step 7.) Rinse your face with warm water and pat dry with a clean towel.

Step 8.) Follow with your usual skincare products, using a facial steam can actually make your products more effective. For example, using a serum or an extra moisturising cream like our Hydrating Facial Silk can really make a difference.

You can have a facial steam once a week as part of your self-care and skin care routine. If you have dry skin, you may want to do this once every two weeks.

Precautions:

Avoid taking a facial steam if you have rosacea, extra sensitive or extra dry skin.

Avoid if have asthma or medical conditions that cause difficulty in breathing. consult your doctor if you are unsure.

Boiling water can SCALD so be extra careful. Make sure your face is approximately 15-20 cm  away from the bowl, it needs to be comfortable, but your face needs to feel hot enough to sweat.

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